Communities & Ecosystems

Projects

Primary Productivity
Population Dynamics
Biome Project

Ecology Information

Communties
Ecosystems
Trophic Levels
Niche
Predator & Prey
Parasitism
Symbiosis
Mutalism
Commensalism

Community/ Ecosystem Sites

Commensalism: What is it, and where does it come from?
Commensalism of P. vulgaris and S. cerevisiae
Commensalism

References

Henderson's Dictionary of Biological Terms, by Eleanor Lawrence. 10th Ed.

 


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Communities & Ecosystems

 

Commensalism

Commensalism occurs when one species benefits from an arrangement, while the other species does not benefit, but nor does the second species suffer. One example that many viewers of nature shows, and divers of tropical waters knows is the clown fish. The clown fish lives among the deadly tentacles of a sea anemone. The anemone's tentacles contains nematocyst, which paralyzes the anemone's prey and protect it against predators. Yet the clown fish is not stunned. Living within the anemone's tentacles, the clown fish also gains protection from the nematocyst, as well as food from left overs of the anemone's meals.